How To Help A Senior Adjust To Assisted Living

Health

The decision to find a Senior In Home Care Provider isn’t always easy and sometimes it may not even be the best solution to the challenges facing your older adult. In some cases, it may be more beneficial to the healthy aging of your senior to place him or her into an assisted living facility.

This can be a very difficult choice to make and an even harder one for your senior to deal with. Having to move out of their home and into a facility where their lifestyle is going to change dramatically is a transition that many seniors may have trouble dealing with. What makes it even tougher is that this is often a decision that is made for them and the transition is being made against their wishes.

Some seniors may welcome the opportunity to live with others whom they might spark friendships and enjoy group activities with on a daily basis. But there are those who will find their new homes unfamiliar, frightening and they will not want to remain in the facility as a result.

That means it’s up to you to make them deal with this new phase of their life in a way that encourages this change and helps them manage this transition as best they can. It will take time, nothing like this will ever work itself out overnight, and so your participation in the process can not only have a calming effect but it will help them manage through this challenging and scary time.

Here are some of the best ways for you to help out and make that adjustment easier to get through:

Do Your Research


This person is a loved one for whom you care very much. You don’t want to stick them into just any facility, you want this place to be the best fit for your senior. That means doing the right amount of research into all of your options.

Get an idea of what life will be like inside this facility. Does it offer certain amenities and programs that your senior will enjoy and want to take part in? You should also read reviews and get unvarnished opinions from people who are living in the facility as well as their families who may come to visit often.

If possible, try to visit some of the top choices on your list with your senior to get his or her thoughts on each of the places you check out. It’s likely that your senior will probably dismiss all of the choices if this is a decision they didn’t make and don’t want any part of.

But for those who are willing to make this move of their own volition, it pays to have them set foot in the facility first, take a tour, and get a sense of what their daily lives will feel like once they move in.

Customized Space


Our homes are a reflection of who we are and what we love. Think about your own home right now, look around at the furnishings and décor. These are all the things you chose to put in your domain so you feel more comfortable and you make your home, well, a home.

But when a senior is taken from his or her home and placed into an assisted living facility, the room in which they will sleep and rest and live will need to feel like their home. Sometimes that room can feel stuffy, clinical, too much like a room inside of an institution.

You can make that staid and generic dwelling feel more personal and inviting by helping your senior customize the space to make it their own. This can be just about anything from hanging or placing framed photos of family and loved ones to using curtains and bedsheets in their favorite color or pattern.

You can also fill the space with sentimental items and artwork that will remind your senior of pleasant memories and good times. Be sure to fill the space with as much familiarity and positivity as you can.

Routine Visits

There is nothing worse than the feeling of being taken from your home and placed into a facility where you know no one and then you never see friends or loved ones ever again. This sense of abandonment can be devastating to seniors moved into an assisted living facility.

Be sure you visit as often as you can as this will make the transition period go by much smoother. If you aren’t there to make them feel like they are still loved, missed, and cared for, they will begin to think you have left them behind and this transition process will never result in your senior feeling like this place is a home. It will feel more like a prison.